NASA Scientists Determined to Unearth Origin of the Iturralde Crater

<<< CLICK FOR LARGER SATTELITE IMAGE

NASA scientists will venture into an isolated part of the Bolivian Amazon to try and uncover the origin of a 5 mile (8 kilometer) diameter crater there known as the Iturralde Crater. Traveling to this inhospitable forest setting, the Iturralde Crater Expedition 2002 will seek to determine if the unusual circular crater was created by a meteor or comet.

Organized by Dr. Peter Wasilewski of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, the Iturralde Crater Expedition 2002 will be led by Dr. Tim Killeen of Conservation International, which is based in Bolivia. Killeen will be assisted by Dr. Compton Tucker of NASA/Goddard. The team intends to collect and analyze rocks and soil, look for glass particles that develop from meteor impacts, and study magnetic properties in the area to determine if the Iturralde site, discovered in the mid-1980s with satellite imagery, was indeed created by a meteor.

If a meteorite were responsible for the impression, rocks in the area would have shock features that do not develop under normal geological circumstances. The team will also look for glass particles, which develop from the high temperatures of impact.

The Iturralde Crater Expedition 2002 team will extensively analyze soil in the impact zone for confirmation of an impact. One unique aspect of the Iturralde site is the 4-5 km deep surface sediment above the bedrock. Thus the impact was more of a gigantic "splat" rather than a collision into bedrock. The large crater is only 1 meter lower in elevation than the surrounding area. Water collects within the depression, but not on the rim of the crater, which is slightly higher than both the surrounding landscape and the interior of the crater. These subtle differences in drainage are reflected in the forest and grassland habitats that developed on the landscape. It is precisely these differences in the vegetation structure that can be observed from space and which led to the identification of the Iturralde Crater in the 1970s when Landsat Images first became available for Bolivia.

Impact craters can also be confirmed through the magnetic study of the impact zone. Dr. Wasilewski’s team will conduct ground magnetometer surveys and will examine the area through an unmanned aerial vehicle plane fitted with a magnetometer, an instrument for measuring the magnitude and direction of magnetic field. The resulting data will be analyzed by associating the magnetic readings with geographical coordinates, to map magnetic properties of the area. The magnetometer data could provide conclusive evidence as to whether or not the Iturralde feature is an impact crater.

The Iturralde Crater Expedition 2002 expedition also contains an education component, funded by the Goddard’s Directors Discretionary Fund for Education. Teachers from around the world who are involved with the teacher professional development program, called Teacher as Scientist, have helped to design the expedition and one teacher will actually be on-site assisting with data collection. University students from Bolivia will also be involved in the expedition. The educational element of the expedition is just as important as the science results," said Patrick Coronado. "This is one of those experiments that stirs the imagination, where science and technology come head-to-head with nature in an attempt to unlock its secrets."

SEPTEMBER 2002
SUN
MON
TUE
WED
THU
FRI
SAT
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Intro Videos. View streaming video of key personnel describing elements of the I.C.E. 2002 Expedition.

File Type: FLASH - REAL Video

Bios. Iturralde Crater Expedition 2002 (ICE 2002) Team member biographies.
Mission PDF. Download a comprehensive PDF report that details the I.C.E. 2002 Expedition.
Archived Webcasts.

File Type: Windows Media

10/03 Radarsat image of the crater. Click icon for image - go here for image background.
Partners. The elite group of partners who have contributed to the expedition and helped to make ICE 2002 a reality.
© 2002 Blue Ice International